Silvertone Model 1454 Thinline Hollow Body Electric Guitar, made by Harmony (1966)

Silvertone Model 1454 Thinline Hollow Body Electric Guitar, made by Harmony  (1966)

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Item # 8282
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Silvertone Model 1454 Model Thinline Hollow Body Electric Guitar, made by Harmony (1966), made in Chicago, red sunburst lacquer finish, laminated maple body, maple neck with rosewood fingerboard.

This relatively flashy thinline hollow-body guitar was the top-of-the-line model from Sears, Roebuck & Co. in the early to mid-1960s. It was made (like many Sears instruments) by the Harmony Company in Chicago as a single-cutaway variation on their own H-75 through H-77 models.

With three DeArmond "Indox" pickups, multiple binding on the body and neck, plus a genuine Bigsby tailpiece, this is a fairly deluxe guitar -- especially for Sears, retailing in 1966 at almost $200. It is also a great-sounding, very versatile instrument with a large sonic palette The three on-off switches allow all possible pickup combinations, and each unit has its own volume and tone control as well.

This particular example was made in 1966 (the pickups are dated the February of that year) and is a nice example of one of Harmony's best guitars, a garage band classic in both sound and style.
 
Overall length is 40 3/4 in. (103.5 cm.), 15 3/4 in. (40 cm.) wide at lower bout, and 1 15/16 in. (4.9 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 24 in. (610 mm.). Width of nut is 1 11/16 in. (43 mm.).

Overall this is a nicely preserved and original guitar. The finish shows some small dings and dents and there are a few minor modifications. The most notable is the tuners have been changed a couple of times, and are currently a set of openback single units that appear to be of 1960s European origin. No extra holes were drilled and the original style Waverly pegs could be restored if desired. A small black line has been added to the side of each knob to make it evident what setting they are on, and the strap button is newer.

The final alteration is more whimsical; it appears someone very carefully removed the "Silvertone" logo from the headstock -- maybe they were embarrassed at having bought their guitar at Sears! The headstock face is now plain with no markings at all, showing only the faintest shadow of where the logo once sat. Other than these points, the guitar remains original and a very good player with only some minor fretwear. Excellent - Condition.